History Changed By Finding Sunken City

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An Ancient City Is Discovered Underwater. What They Found Will Change History Forever

Heracleion excavations2, ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Posted on: December 1, 2013 · By Sunny Skyz

The city of Heracleion was engulfed underwater 1500 years ago. This grand city had been mentioned by the Greek writer Herodotus, the 5th-century BC historian. He had told a wonderful tale of Helen of Troy, who traveled to Heracleion, then a port of ‘great wealth’, with her Trojan lover, Paris.

When French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio stumbled upon some relics, it led them to one of the greatest finds of the 21st century; a city underwater. The discovery took place when Goddio had been in search of Napoleon’s warships from the 1798 Battle of the Nile, when he had been defeated by Nelson in these very waters, but to his surprise, he stumbled upon this magnificent discovery.

The discoveries include the colossal statues of the Egyptian goddess Isis, the god Hapi, and an unidentified Egyptian pharaoh, all preserved in excellent condition by their muddy burial shroud. Along with these 16ft statues there are hundreds of smaller statues of Egyptian gods, among them the figures that guarded the temple where Cleopatra who was inaugurated as Queen of the Nile. Dozens of sarcophagi have also been found, containing the bodies of mummified animals sacrificed to Amun-Gereb, the supreme god of the Egyptians. Many amulets, or religious charms, have been unearthed, too, showing gods such as Isis, Osiris and Horus.

Evidence shows that Heracleion slipped into its watery grave sometime in the 6th or 7th century AD. The discovery of Heracleion will now add depth and detail to our knowledge of the ancient world, because among the discoveries, there are perfectly preserved inscribed pillars decorated with hieroglyphics.

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Found a Goddess statue underwater

Heracleion, a much prosperous and a known city had been engulfed underwater 1500 years ago. This grand city had also been mentioned by the Greek writer Herodotus, the 5th-century BC historian. He had told a wonderful tale of Helen of Troy, the most beautiful woman in the world, who had launched a thousand ships, travelled to Heracleion, then a port of ‘great wealth’, with her glamorous Trojan lover, Paris.

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But until 2001, there had been no evidence of the city from this classical tale. But when a group led by French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio stumbled upon some relics, it led them to one of the greatest finds of the 21st century, a city underwater. The discovery took place when Goddio had been in search of Napoleon’s warships from the 1798 Battle of the Nile, when he had been defeated by Nelson in these very waters, but to his surprise, he stumbled upon this magnificent discovery. Goddio’s team has since been joined by the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology and the Department of Antiquities of Egypt to produce a wealth of dazzling finds. 2013.12.06_15h56m45s_003_

The discoveries include the colossal statues of the Egyptian goddess Isis, the god Hapi, and an unidentified Egyptian pharaoh, all preserved in excellent condition by their muddy burial shroud. Along with these 16ft statues there are hundreds of smaller statues of Egyptian gods, among them the figures that guarded the temple where Cleopatra who was inaugurated as Queen of the Nile. Dozens of sarcophagi have also been found, containing the bodies of mummified animals sacrificed to Amun-Gereb, the supreme god of the Egyptians. Many amulets, or religious charms, have been unearthed, too, showing gods such as Isis, Osiris and Horus. These had been created not only for Egyptians but also for visiting traders who used to incorporate them into their religion or kept them as trinkets.

Heracleion The Lost Egyptian Underwater City

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Heracleion can now be added to the number as Egypt’s most important port during the time of the later pharaohs. The importance of Heracleion has further been seen by the discovery of 64 ships, the largest number of ancient vessels ever found in one place and a fascinating 700 anchors. The city had been a major motorway junction. It had a naturally navigable channel next to its ancient harbor and a further artificial channel appears to had been dug to accelerate trade. 2013.12.06_15h57m52s_005_

The very name of the city had been taken from the most famous of Greek heroes, Heracles aka Hercules whose 12 labors had killed the Hydra and had captured Cerberus, the multi-headed hellhound that guarded the gates of the Underworld who had captivated the ancient world. Heraklion, Crete’s capital and largest city, had also been named after Heracles, as was Herculaneum, the ancient Roman town that had been buried under ash when Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD. When Heracleion had faded in importance in the later classical period, its neighboring city of Alexandria had become the capital of Egypt in 312BC. 2013.12.06_15h58m12s_006_

The discovery of Heracleion will now add depth and detail to our knowledge of the ancient world, because among the discoveries, there are perfectly preserved steles (inscribed pillars) decorated with hieroglyphics. Once translated, they will reveal much about the religious and political life in this corner of ancient Egypt. A similar inscription on the Rosetta stone had been discovered in the Nile Delta town of Rosetta in 1799 by a French soldier, and now preserved in the British Museum, it had cracked the code of hieroglyphics in the first place. 2013.12.06_15h58m34s_007_

And like the Rosetta stone, those steles found beneath the waters of Aboukir Bay are inscribed in Greek and Egyptian, too. The possibility of discovery of many more archaeological gems at Heracleion has now been opened. 2013.12.06_15h58m51s_008_

Moreover, Heracleion had been extremely crucial to the economy of the ancient world. This can be seen in the discovery of gold coins and lead, bronze and stone weights from Athens (used to measure the value of goods and to calculate the tax owed), which depicts that Heracleion had been a lucrative Mediterranean post. 2013.12.06_15h59m14s_009_

On the discovery of this magnificent city, the archaeologists had first faced the mammoth task of reassembling massive stone fragments on the seabed before they could haul them to the surface. Twelve years on, their fabulous finds have been exposed to public view for the first time after more than a millennium spent beneath the silt and water of Aboukir Bay, 20 miles northeast of Alexandria. 2013.12.06_15h59m48s_010_

Evidence shows that Heracleion slipped into its watery grave sometime in the 6th or 7th century AD. The discovery of this splendid city in Egypt has been thrilling and mesmerizing.

A Sunken City Named Heracleion Gets Discovered After 1500 Years

http://www.aroundthe-world.info/a-sunken-city-named-heracleion-gets-discovered-after-1500-years/

Oldest Underwater Ancient Civilization In The World Discovered

Published on Jul 3, 2013

Oldest Underwater Ancient Civilization In The World // Pre Ice Age – Atlantis. Civilizations Geologist and author Robert M. Schoch has been instrumental in bringing attention to the interrelationships between geological and astronomical phenomena, catastrophes, and the early history of civilization. He shared his contention that certain ancient civilizations are much older than typically reported, and were likely brought down by cataclysmic solar and earth changes. Schoch was one of the first to suggest that the Sphinx was far older than Egyptologists thought, dating to around 7,000 BC or further back. He has recently been studying the archaeological site of Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, a series of around 20 magnificently carved stone circles. It would have been difficult to carve and move around these 10-15 ton blocks which are tall and thin, without breaking them, suggesting they had advanced skills, he noted.

One excavator at the Gobekli site has estimated it dates back as far as 9,000 to 10,000 BC. Interestingly, Plato dated Atlantis to around 9600 BC which would correlate with the Gobekli timeline, Schoch pointed out, adding that there were likely intense solar flares at this time that heralded the end of the Ice Age. As shown in the work of Anthony Peratt, ancient petroglyphs may have depicted some of the intense solar plasma discharges.

Schoch has also investigated Easter Island, which contains huge, mysterious megalithic statues. Some of the relics were carved out of basalt, but the only place for a quarry for this material is underwater, which suggests to him that the civilization that created the statues is older than conventionally thought. He expressed concern that modern society with its extensive electric grid is unprepared for the kind of solar flare that hit in 1859, which literally fried telegraph wires. Schoch will be presenting his latest research at the Yuga Cycle of the Ages conference in Northern California in May.

Biography:

Robert Schoch has a Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from Yale and has been working in Egypt focusing on the Great Sphinx and Great Pyramid, since 1990. He is a tenured full-time faculty member at the College of General Studies of Boston University where he has taught a variety of science courses since 1984. Based on his geological studies, Robert has determined that the Sphinx’s origins go back to pre-dynastic times, thousands of years older than previously thought. In recent years, Dr. Schoch has expanded his research to encompass pyramids and associated structures around the world.

Göbekli Tepe is the world’s oldest known religious structure.[4] The site, located on a hilltop, contains 20 round structures which had been buried, four of which have been excavated. Each round structure has a diameter of between 10 and 30 meters (30 and 100 ft) and all are decorated with massive, mostly T-shaped, limestone pillars that are the most striking feature of the site. The limestone slabs were quarried from bedrock pits located around 100 meters (330 ft) from the hilltop, with neolithic workers using flint points to carve the bedrock.[9] The majority of flint tools found at the site are Byblos and Nemrik points. That neolithic people with such primitive flint tools quarried, carved, transported uphill, and erected these massive pillars has astonished the archaeological world, and must have required a staggering amount of labor.[10]

Two pillars are at the center of each circle, possibly intended to help support a roof, and up to eight pillars are evenly positioned around the walls of the room. The spaces between the pillars are lined with unworked stone and there are stone benches between each set of pillars around the edges of the wall.[11]

Many of the pillars are decorated with carved reliefs of animals and of abstract enigmatic pictograms. The pictograms may represent commonly understood sacred symbols, as known from Neolithic cave paintings elsewhere. The reliefs depict lions, bulls, boars, foxes, gazelles, donkeys, snakes and other reptiles, insects, arachnids, and birds, particularly vultures. (At the time the shrine was constructed, the surrounding country was much lusher and capable of sustaining this variety of wildlife, before millennia of settlement and cultivation resulted in the near–Dust Bowl conditions prevailing today.)[8] Vultures also feature prominently in the iconography of the Neolithic sites of Çatalhöyük and Jericho; it is believed that in the early Neolithic culture of Anatolia and the Near East the deceased were deliberately exposed in order to be excarnated by vultures and other carrion birds. (The head of the deceased was sometimes removed and preserved—possibly a sign of ancestor worship.)[12] This, then, would represent an early form of sky burial, as practiced today by Tibetan Buddhists and by Zoroastrians in India.[13]

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